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Nearly two-thirds of the nation's single-family home builders are putting single-family construction projects on hold due to a severe lack of acquisition, development and construction financing, according to a new builder survey conducted by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB).

Home Builders are Strapped for Credit

Nearly two-thirds of the nation’s single-family home builders are putting single-family construction projects on hold due to a severe lack of acquisition, development and construction financing, according to a new builder survey conducted by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB).

“Across the country, home builders and developers are reporting a deterioration in credit availability and intensifying pressure on borrowers with outstanding loans,” said NAHB Chairman Joe Robson, a home builder from Tulsa, Okla. “Lenders are cutting off loans for viable new housing projects and producing unnecessary foreclosures and losses on AD&C loans. With the pending expiration of the $8,000 first-time home buyer tax credit, these challenges threaten to halt any positive developments we have seen in the housing market in recent months.”

In the latest NAHB survey of AD&C financing conditions, 63 percent of builders stated that the availability of credit for single-family construction loans worsened in the second quarter of 2009.

Builders reporting deteriorating credit conditions cited the following reasons: 80 percent said that lenders are lowering the allowable loan-to-value ratio, 76 percent reported that lenders are not making new loans, 75 percent stated that lenders are reducing the amount they are willing to lend and 62 percent said that lenders are requiring personal guarantees or collateral not related to the project.

While Federal banking regulators continue to maintain that they are not instructing institutions to stop making loans or to indiscriminately liquidate outstanding loans, builders responding to the survey cited the top reason that lenders have given them for restricting the availability of new loans or for tightening the terms of outstanding loans is that “regulators are forcing lenders to do it.”

NAHB said that regulators and lenders should provide leeway to residential construction borrowers who have loans in good standing by providing flexibility on re-appraisals, loan modifications and perhaps forbearance on loans to give builders time to complete and sell their inventory.

“There can be no meaningful economic recovery until the flow of credit is restored to housing,” said Robson.

Access to AD&C credit has plagued builders for nearly a year. Last November builders with outstanding construction loans reported that they are having to stop work on new housing developments and are losing sales as the result of failed banks and thrift institutions being taken over by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

At the time one builder, for example, complained that he was unable to receive a draw on his construction loan for more than four weeks and, as a result, was unable to finish work on homes that have already been sold. He said that there was a possibility that the FDIC will also require another appraisal of his homes, which would cause more delays and further jeopardize the viability of his project.

One comment

  1. it’s a tough situation for everyone. the credit crunch doesn’t seem to be changing anytime soon so hunker down and do what you need to do to get through these times. hopefully all the home builders make it through. does anyone else see the light at the end of the tunnel?! it’s pretty dim but stay positive!

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