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The average home entering the foreclosure process today won't house new owners until the next President has been inaugurated and in office for three months.

Foreclosures Now Take 20 Months

The average home entering the foreclosure process today won’t house new owners until the next President has been inaugurated and in office for three months.

New data from LPS shows that payments have not been made on the average loan in foreclosure in a record 599 days, or 20 months. Of the nearly 1.9 million loans that are 90 or more days delinquent but not yet in foreclosure, 42 percent have not made a payment in more than a year with an average delinquency of 397 days, also a new record.

At the same time, first-time foreclosure starts in June were near three-year lows, and first-time delinquencies accounted for only 25 percent of new delinquent inventory, according July Mortgage Monitor report released by Lender Processing Services, Inc.

As of the end of June, 4.1 million loans were either 90 or more days delinquent or in foreclosure, as delinquencies remain two times and foreclosures eight times pre-crisis levels. Foreclosure sales remain constricted, with foreclosure starts outnumbering sales by a factor of almost three to one. The slowdown is most pronounced in judicial foreclosure states, which maintain a foreclosure and seriously delinquent pipeline that is more than three times as long as non-judicial states. On average, at the current rate of foreclosure sales, judicial foreclosure states would require 111 months to work through inventories of loans that are 90 or more days delinquent or in foreclosure as compared to non-judicial states, which would be able to clear the inventories in approximately 32 months.

The total U.S. loan delinquency rate is now 8.34 percent. The month-over-month change in delinquency rate is 2.4 percent and the total U.S foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate is now 4.11 percent.

3 comments

  1. So it seems that an investor would do better to purchase a property in a non-judicial foreclosure state, where the foreclosed inventory won’t hang overhead for so long.
    BTW, anyone have a table of judicial / non-judicial states?

  2. Yes, you can find a list of judicial and non-judicial states in the educational sections of both the RealtyTrac and ForeclosureRadar sites.

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